You’ve Been Voluntold!

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confusedIf you’re anything like myself – you do a great deal of local networking. At least two or three days a week, you might run into me at some event or another. Some are professional groups where my target customers lurk and others are general professional organizations local and national. In a few of these organizations I play a managerial role, (one I’m the president). As you may well understand this takes a great deal of commitment and effort. I absolutely believe that these groups help get my brand in front of the right people who desire what I’m offering. I have a strategy for my efforts and all involve being in control of my efforts. I’m proud that my brand commands the respect of my peers and as such I never have to suffer the the terrible affliction of being “voluntold.”

If you’re on a committee or two but fail to show up when you’re needed to participate, you will fall fate to joining efforts you are unaware of at the time you were induced. Some describe it this way – ” the fasted way to getting the worst job on a committee is to not show up at an important meeting.” At that critical meeting your brethren will take great pleasure in volunteering you, and if this happens – brother you’ve been VOLUNTOLD!”

Being Voluntold is the scarlet letter of organizations. If you’re Voluntold too many times your personal brand is going to take a beating. For the sake of your brand, be aware of the importance of meetings and your responsibility within a group.

You’ve been warned.

Comments

  1. this is so true..people tend to gang up on the person who is absent, getting the most assigned tasks, butt of most jokes, etc..this is so true in <a href=”http://www.tynesideskips.co.uk”>our company</a> though we only have several staff maintaining it..

  2. I guess it pays to show up (in most cases).

  3. Elana Winfrey says

    Ed, for this very reason, I have limited the number of networking meetings I attend. Over-committment can lead to dropping the ball. I say pick one or two groups to be consistent with, and then attend one-time events here and there. That’s my strategy. Thanks for the insight!

  4. I don’t know why people do this and what they found to do this but i agree with the Elana strategy.
     
     
     
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  7. I agree.  This didn’t exactly happen to me but just simply skipping a few networking meetings set me down a few notches in my authority in the group.  When I came back, a few new faces were more important than me.  Good warning!

  8. FashStylo says

    Yeah you are saying true. I agree with you.

  9. Sage advice for those who think meetings don’t matter. Another good point is to show up on time and have read any relevant material beforehand. I love the term “voluntold”. Very creative, thanks!

  10. OnlineJobsGuy says

    I’ve seen this first hand in several Fortune 500 companies. Only those who actively participate seem to rise to the top, while the ones who don’t remain stagnant (no matter what the talent level).